Ales Kot writes because nothing else makes sense. He's responsible for screenplays, video games, graphic novels and products/experiences which do not even have their names assigned as of yet. His portfolio includes Disney, Warner Brothers, Image Comics, Marvel Entertainment, DC Entertainment, Dark Horse Comics and more.

If you want to contact him, his email is aleskotsays at gmail and his cell phone is 310-259-7803. If you want to talk with his manager, contact Ari Lubet at 3 Arts Entertainment. If you want to talk with his agents, contact Roger Green and Phil d'Amecourt at WME Entertainment. If you want to talk with his lawyer, contact Caitlin DiMotta at Impact Law Group. If you want to talk with his imaginary platypus, you better imagine it.

creaturesofcomfort:

ArtNews. April 1972.“Sweet and Sour” by Ed Ruscha.(Strawberries, peppers, olives, peaches, anchovies, pickles, washes of jam juice.)

creaturesofcomfort:

ArtNews. April 1972.
“Sweet and Sour” by Ed Ruscha.
(Strawberries, peppers, olives, peaches, anchovies, pickles, washes of jam juice.)

spectrumvivace:

William S.  BURROUGHS - SCRAP BOOK 3. Genève, Claude Givaudan, 1979.

spectrumvivace:

William S.  BURROUGHS - SCRAP BOOK 3. Genève, Claude Givaudan, 1979.

I think there has been a huge shift among younger women in the last half-decade, comparable maybe to the change in public opinion about legalised marijuana. This shift has occurred across the culture, from the ground up, online, from the great expanses of blog-land, in entertainment media, and in New York publishing and media circles. Like the illogic of soft-drug prohibition, certain conditions of patriarchy are simply no longer tolerable.

There is a great energy that comes with this shift, which can be seen in various start-ups at all levels: Sarah Nicole Prickett’s Adult, the first feminist sex magazine that is both feminist and sexy; Jane Pratt’s xoJane; Jezebel and the Hairpin; Gawker and the Awl’s female subsidiaries. Younger women like Dayna Tortoricci have enacted huge editorial changes at n+1, which serves as a kind of high-culture feeder into mainstream New York publishing. The culturally-current online magazine the New Inquiry was founded by three female editors.

- Chris Kraus, “The New Universal"  (via adult-mag)
Anonymous asked:
Is it possible for someone to be turned on by really huge, round rooftop geometry?

Ales Kot
Ales Kot answered:

Why should I ever limit the possible? So, yes.

Anonymous asked:
imagine you are not writing, what would you do? what would be the second best thing to do in your life?

Ales Kot
Ales Kot answered:

I’m not really interested in second best things or not writing, so it’s hard for me to even conceive of such a thing. I would have to imagine a different part of a multiverse, a part of the multiverse where I no longer feel the need to write, and what would I be doing? The thing about your questions is they posit that writing has to be the best thing and then there are second best things, and that is not true. Everything I want in my life are the best things, the best people, the best…fuck, that sounds so horrifyingly middle-class aspirational, doesn’t it? But I do, I do want everything to be the best, and everyone, but not according to some sort of an imaginary criteria developed via judgment, but through feeling, through the tactility of seeing with the heart wide open, the way one would open up a ribcage with their own hands in order to allow the actual organ to meet the same organ of another person, heart on heart becoming a much more sexually charged situation yet at the same time that is only a part of it, because what if the hearts thumping against each other only bring out kindness and stillness? In other words, I have no idea.

Anonymous asked:
how does your day normally look like?

Ales Kot
Ales Kot answered:

I maintain that in order to live fully I have to be willing to shed any idea of a normal or firm or ideal schedule at a moment’s notice, and thankfully I am able to do so, but nevertheless I do find deep joy in having a schedule, and the variation that is currently emerging as the leading one is by far my most favorite.

I wake up around 5-6 am, ideally in the same bed as Fifi. I stay in bed for a little bit, maybe ten minutes, maybe two, reflecting upon being alive, or what being alive is supposed to be, because how do I know I am alive, how do I know this is not just a dream of a brain that died and is now replaying its entire life? This, of course, is one of the theories that explain déjà vu. 

But the first thing I tend to do is hug (for the first time in the day consciously, as we usually wake up unconsciously intertwined) and kiss Fiona, and then do that again, here and there, while doing the above. 

I get up, ideally remembering my dreams, and write them into my dream diary, which I have kept updated for over a year now. I wash my face with cold water and prepare rolled oats and the first mug of Earl Grey. The trick to the oats is to throw in raisins, pour some hemp milk over them, cut strawberries and throw them in, hemp seeds, coconut oil, then pour boiling water over them, mix and let sit for five minutes, then add cinnamon, throw walnuts and sometimes pecans on top. Everything used has to be organic, high quality produce, because my food is my fuel and the cleaner the fuel the cleaner the energy derived from it, my perception, my body, and such. 

I sit down, read an essay or an interview or a few articles while eating, spending no more than 10-15 minutes on this. I sip the tea. I dive into writing. 

Four hours later I am done writing. At this point it’s somewhere between 10-11:30 am. I work out, prepare lunch and protein shake, eat my vitamins. After that — whatever I fancy. 

"We’re talking about an ideology marked by the selling off of public goods to private interests; the attack on social provisions; the rise of the corporate state organized around privatization, free trade, and deregulation; the celebration of self interests over social need; the elevation of the notion that profit-making is basically the essence of democracy to the highest ideal and the utterly reductionist notion that consumption is the only applicable form of citizenship. But even more than that, it upholds the notion that the market serves as a model for structuring all social relations: not just the economy, but the governing of all of social life. I think that as a mode of governance, it is really quite dreadful because it tends to produce identities, subjects, ways of life driven by a kind of "survival of the fittest" ethic, grounded in the notion of the free, possessive individual and committed to the right of individual and ruling groups to accrue wealth removed from matters of ethics and social cost."

Henry Giroux on neoliberalism — see full interview.

"We don’t realize what we’re walking on half the time.”

believermag:

image

An Interview with Blake Butler

Wherever and whatever “the line” may be, the power of transgressive fiction comes from finding and crossing it. Plenty of books get there, but Blake Butler’s immense 300,000,000 begins on the far side and only goes farther, into a zone not meant for humans but still somehow perceptible to us, or to what will be left of us once what’s going to happen happens.

Opening as a prolonged rant, we’re thrown right away into the consciousness of a maniac called Gretch Gravey who, possessed by someone or something called Darrel, musters an army of lost boys to kill everyone in America (the 300,000,000 of the title is our former population). Into the wormhole opened by this devastation plunges Flood, a detective who serves as the reader’s shaky interpreter until he’s so overcome by the terrain that all sense is drained out of him. Then, in a place devoid of life but richly haunted by emergent, bastard forms of perception, the rest of the novel plays out in a state that I’ve never before felt a text induce in me.

The America of 300,000,000 is beyond collapse, over the brink that ours feels like it’s approaching. Threading its ultraviolence through suburbs, outlet malls, and a kind of normalcy wrapped around animal terror—“Outside, in the mash surrounding the house with cash and unending television…My skin around me did a slither”—its response to the spate of shootings of recent years does more than those events ever could to expose the black heart that both animates and threatens to annihilate everyone currently alive in this country.

Butler’s books have always been minds to sync up with and wander through, rather than guided tours of pre-existing places, but never before has he deformed the shape of his reader’s consciousness to this degree.

I spoke with Blake by phone in August. I was in New York and he was in Atlanta.

—David Rice

I. BLOW MYSELF OUT OF THE WATER

THE BELIEVER: 300,000,000 makes an extreme demand on the reader’s attention. It’s a book that says, “Fuck you, sit down, and listen.” It almost feels like bondage, another kind of violence beyond the violence of the subject matter. 

BLAKE BUTLER: I’m glad that that comes through, because it was also violent to write. When I started it, I was probably in the worst emotional state of my life. I was like, “If I’m going to do this, I just have to explode. There’s nothing to hold back this time.” I feel like books are marginalized at this point too, so if I’m going to get your attention to make you even open the book, I’m going to take you by the fucking coat collar. I’m not trying to be macabre, but I was thinking, “This is going to be the last book I ever write.” 

BLVR: A lot of your work has a pre-apocalyptic quality. Like the world’s in the process of ending. But in this book it feels like even that mindset is blowing up, like it was the terminus of some trajectory for you. 

BB: It was definitely a transition point for me. I didn’t know what else to do, and I felt like I was pacing the same places again in everything I tried to write. That, coupled with being beside my dad dying over a slow four-year period, and I was also going through a really bad breakup—everything felt like shit to me. And I write all day every day, so when I feel unproductive, it magnifies everything else. It was just this collision of factors where I was like, “I’m gonna do everything I can to make this have every trick in my mind on paper, and then I don’t give a fuck what happens after that.” My main goal was to blow myself out of the water.

Read More

"I guess I got to the point where it’s all me, and only I am to blame, and that feels really great."

Are you all paying attention to FKA Twigs?

70sscifiart:

David Pelham

70sscifiart:

David Pelham


“Ripped: T-Shirts from the Underground”
fifidunks:

I I I I I

fifidunks:

I I I I I

traddmoore:

ZERO #2

Released October 16, 2013

Created and Written by Ales Kot
Illustrated by Tradd Moore
Colors by Jordie Bellaire
Letters by Clayton Cowles
Design by Tom Muller

Catch up on this fantastic, multi-artist, ongoing comic today. There are two collected trade paperbacks available, so snag them at your local comic shop or from another vendor of your preference:

ComiXology

Amazon