Ales Kot writes because nothing else makes sense. He's responsible for screenplays, video games, graphic novels and products/experiences which do not even have their names assigned as of yet. His portfolio includes Disney, Warner Brothers, Image Comics, Marvel Entertainment, DC Entertainment, Dark Horse Comics and more.

If you want to contact him, his email is aleskotsays at gmail and his cell phone is 310-259-7803. If you want to talk with his manager, contact Ari Lubet at 3 Arts Entertainment. If you want to talk with his agents, contact Roger Green and Phil d'Amecourt at WME Entertainment. If you want to talk with his lawyer, contact Caitlin DiMotta at Impact Law Group. If you want to talk with his imaginary platypus, you better imagine it.


“Ripped: T-Shirts from the Underground”
fifidunks:

I I I I I

fifidunks:

I I I I I

traddmoore:

ZERO #2

Released October 16, 2013

Created and Written by Ales Kot
Illustrated by Tradd Moore
Colors by Jordie Bellaire
Letters by Clayton Cowles
Design by Tom Muller

Catch up on this fantastic, multi-artist, ongoing comic today. There are two collected trade paperbacks available, so snag them at your local comic shop or from another vendor of your preference:

ComiXology

Amazon

Hey, all men in my feed — read this NOW

http://flavorwire.com/482285/27-feminist-writers-recommend-books-every-man-should-read/

And then go get some books.

fifidunks:


What were you like as a kid? Did you live in “girl world” as the characters in your movie do?I was in love with being a girl. It was an almost erotic girlhood. I think Coco also demonstrated that space, and I identified. When I encountered the adult world, I became more self-conscious of girlhood, of the power it had over adults. From kindergarten until age twenty-two, I sublimated my femininity into a kind of strapped conventional neutrality.What was it about kindergarten and the adult world that made you sublimate?I think institutions thrive to an extent on fear, that they’re needed to provide some order. From an early age, you’re taught that you need certain things to happen within that space in order for you to be, like, functional. Even when you’re five, you’re told that. I also think there’s something about encountering adults and the idea that predators were out there… I just remember being totally afraid of aliens and Jesus and men.

Aliens and Jesus and men! My interview with Margaret Haines on Sex Magazine.

fifidunks:

What were you like as a kid? Did you live in “girl world” as the characters in your movie do?
I was in love with being a girl. It was an almost erotic girlhood. I think Coco also demonstrated that space, and I identified. When I encountered the adult world, I became more self-conscious of girlhood, of the power it had over adults. From kindergarten until age twenty-two, I sublimated my femininity into a kind of strapped conventional neutrality.
What was it about kindergarten and the adult world that made you sublimate?
I think institutions thrive to an extent on fear, that they’re needed to provide some order. From an early age, you’re taught that you need certain things to happen within that space in order for you to be, like, functional. Even when you’re five, you’re told that. I also think there’s something about encountering adults and the idea that predators were out there… I just remember being totally afraid of aliens and Jesus and men.

Aliens and Jesus and men! My interview with Margaret Haines on Sex Magazine.

fifidunks:


I know you have a very strong and powerful relationship with your father– can you talk a bit about that?My father celebrated my uniqueness, and now so do I. This is why I am so adamant about control, expression, and my personal freedom. I don’t feel like I have to change or impress anyone to move farther vocationally. There isn’t a gap missing. I don’t put myself in compromising situations for approval from higher powers such as labels and mainstream expectations.Because of my father’s unconditional and sweet love, I really think that I have been saved from the dark side of music.What creative obstacles have you encountered?I’ve had multiple people try to change my aesthetic or sound, censor me, or water my image down in the past. Obviously I wasn’t having it, so I no longer have relationships with these people and became more talented and more successful than they anticipated. My art and my career speaks for itself.Where does your dream performance take place?I would say a futuristic night club in Heaven, with my Mom sitting front row with God or Tupac as her date.

Princess Nokia cover girl of Sex Magazine Issue 9…

fifidunks:

I know you have a very strong and powerful relationship with your father– can you talk a bit about that?
My father celebrated my uniqueness, and now so do I. This is why I am so adamant about control, expression, and my personal freedom. I don’t feel like I have to change or impress anyone to move farther vocationally. There isn’t a gap missing. I don’t put myself in compromising situations for approval from higher powers such as labels and mainstream expectations.Because of my father’s unconditional and sweet love, I really think that I have been saved from the dark side of music.
What creative obstacles have you encountered?
I’ve had multiple people try to change my aesthetic or sound, censor me, or water my image down in the past. Obviously I wasn’t having it, so I no longer have relationships with these people and became more talented and more successful than they anticipated. My art and my career speaks for itself.
Where does your dream performance take place?
I would say a futuristic night club in Heaven, with my Mom sitting front row with God or Tupac as her date.

Princess Nokia cover girl of Sex Magazine Issue 9

A good sort of a NYCC interview with yours truly, feat. the new mustache, politics, sex, etc. 

fifidunks:

Cameron in her Navy uniform in the early 1940s

fifidunks:

Cameron in her Navy uniform in the early 1940s