Ales Kot writes because nothing else makes sense. He's responsible for screenplays, video games, graphic novels and products/experiences which do not even have their names assigned as of yet. His portfolio includes Disney, Warner Brothers, Image Comics, Marvel Entertainment, DC Entertainment, Dark Horse Comics and more.

If you want to contact him, his email is aleskotsays at gmail and his cell phone is 310-259-7803. If you want to talk with his manager, contact Ari Lubet at 3 Arts Entertainment. If you want to talk with his agents, contact Roger Green and Phil d'Amecourt at WME Entertainment. If you want to talk with his lawyer, contact Caitlin DiMotta at Impact Law Group. If you want to talk with his imaginary platypus, you better imagine it.

PHILIPS: The great thing about the psychoanalytic treatment is that it doesn’t work in the usual sense of work. I don’t mean by this to avoid the fact that it addresses human suffering. I only mean that it takes for granted that an awful lot of human suffering is simply intractable, that there’s a sense in which character is intractable. People change, but there really are limits. One thing you discover in psychoanalytic treatment is the limits of what you can change about yourself or your life. We are children for a very long time. INTERVIEWER: So what’s the point? PHILLIPS: The point is that it’s an experiment in what your life might be like if you speak freely to another person—speak and allow that person to show you the ways in which you stop yourself thinking and speaking freely. I don’t mean by that that it doesn’t change symptoms. I know by my own experience that it does. But I think the most interesting thing about it is its unpredictability. If you buy a fridge, there are certain things you will be guaranteed. If you buy a psychoanalysis, you won’t be. It’s a real risk, and that also is the point of it. Patients come because they are suffering from something. They want that suffering to be alleviated. Ideally, in the process of doing the analysis, they might find their suffering is alleviated or modified, but also they might discover there are more important things than to alleviate one’s suffering.

Paris Review: Interview with Adam Phillips

"When most Americans think about teachers, we don’t imagine mediocre or average minds ingrained with pedestrian prejudices. We don’t much imagine teachers who are irrationally afraid of black kids, even though we know many if not all white Americans are irrationally afraid of black kids. We know many American adults believe all sorts of crazy things, and we caution children not to trust strangers. At the same time, we turn them over to a structure of civil servants that was originally designed to teach them to obey the King of Prussia. Is it possible that the American public education system is a really bad idea? And can I even say that without becoming a tool in an anti-worker corporate agenda?"

The New Inquiry: Not For Teacher

"It’s super-weird that adults should be dictating what teenagers like in any way, aesthetically or morally."

This Interview piece with Tavi Gevinson and Claire Boucher (Grimes) is…I don’t want to use hype here, go some obvious overgeneralizing dumb route, so I’ll just say it warms my heart and helps me think and consider things and I am grateful I got a chance to read it. How’s that? Good. Now click. 

And then, later: let’s consider that most people writing comics in the top three most sold publishers in the US (at least, and probably more like top 10-15) are heterosexual white men in their thirties or forties. I am one of the youngest and most successful writers (and also white men, albeit not identifying as hetero, at least) in comics and I am turning twenty-eight this month. I got my first comic published when I was twenty-five. Jack Kirby got his start in comics when he was nineteen. That’s a six year gap right there, and I am a fairly unique case in being where I am so supposedly early, although it feels late to me, often, and the truth of the matter is that it’s exactly when it’s supposed to be, probably.

I had to work my ass off to get recognized. The publisher line for a graphic novel about school shootings, acid and multiverse theories was non-existent. The idea that a boy/man with a fairly strong (at the time) accent, freshly off the boat in a new country, should be working in our industry? Sure, wait a few years, kid. Take the runaround. Eat shit (or tuna from a can, which in a few months becomes the same thing, and if you want to make it special, throw some rice and mustard on it). We don’t care that you have acclaimed artists lined up. So your stories are good? No one gives a shit. We need the stuff that already sold. Or, you know, we need you to succeed somewhere else first, then we can work with you. 

Cue Filip Sablik of then Top Cow giving me a small but important gig and Eric Stephenson of Image Comics giving me a chance — and I’ve been with Image Comics ever since. Seeing as I am a person who was perpetually told my dreams would fail — even by my own family — and seeing the history of abuse and bad shit and the air that kills you where I mostly grew up, this isn’t a small thing. 

But this isn’t about me.

If this was hard for me — and I survived it and got somewhere good as a still fairly privileged white male, how hard is it to be a young woman? Or a young woman of color, for that matter? 

"It wasn’t 100% socially unacceptable to be a total space-case either: this was the era of Mondo 2000, of Douglas Rushkoff being a thing, of The Shamen having hit records referencing Terrence McKenna and saying “ooh coming on like a seventh sense”. You couldn’t turn round in a rave of any kind without bumping into someone who believed that aliens seeded civilisation, that if you put 23 speakers in a circle their soundwaves would create a crystal formation and invoke higher intelligences, that ketamine turned your brain into an astral aerial etc etc etc. And despite all the silliness, musically, this wasn’t such an awful place to be. The free parties on the beaches and the South Downs attracted all walks of raver life and were often glorious, and nights like Megadog and Megatripolis were incredible parties, with their omnipresent UV and alien motifs creating a space for total abandon. Dancing in a Club Dog “BOIL YOUR HEAD” t-shirt in the middle of the floor to Aphex Twin and Orbital live sets at the Megadog /Midi Circus tour, on my 19th birthday, then stumbling over the road to fire bolts of pure blue lightning out of my face into the night sky* definitely counts as one of the most intense experiences of my life."

Fact Mag: Joe Muggs is a rubbish raver

"The bleak male rage is problematic. Roughly 90% of violence in the world is perpetrated by men. We also start most wars. The bleak male rage is the “black thing” war veterans with PTSD talk about. To quote Alan Moore’s “25,000 Years of Erotic Freedom,” sexually open and progressive cultures such as ancient Greece have given the West almost all of its civilizing aspects, whereas sexually repressive cultures such as late Rome have given us the Dark Ages. We live in a world where we are taught to be afraid of sexuality but we accept hate and violence as normal parts of our daily lives. We can show a head torn off in a comic without a problem but a woman’s nipple gets people upset. It’s time to change that narrative. In order to understand what is happening I posit that the root factor of violence is often shame. The church or the government (what’s the difference, really?) tell us what we can do and can not do with our bodies, which parts we can show and which parts we can not — and unless we’re harming other people, there is never any need for that. What then does such repression do? What is the aim? I posit that the aim is to create soldiers. All the unspent energy has to go somewhere. Sex dissolves barriers. War creates them. As long as we stay unaware of our conditioning, we might be processed by the machine. How to get out of it? Exploration and dissection are perhaps always the first moves. Identify the systems and then act. A healthy dose of screwing also helps."

From a new interview with Nerdist.

marcorudy:

Loki Laufeysson. #Loki #Asgard #Colors #Comics #watercolor #Acrylic #Marvel #AfterBuscema #JohnBuscema #TricksterGod #WinterSoldier


From Winter Soldier #2.

marcorudy:

Loki Laufeysson. #Loki #Asgard #Colors #Comics #watercolor #Acrylic #Marvel #AfterBuscema #JohnBuscema #TricksterGod #WinterSoldier

From Winter Soldier #2.

ZERO Vol. 2 paperback wrap cover. ZERO Vol. 2 paperback. ZERO Vol. 2 title page. ZERO Vol. 2 chapter pages. ZERO Vol. 2 gallery. ZERO Vol. 2 gallery. ZERO Vol. 2 end paper.

hellomuller:

Released yesterday, ZERO Vol. 2: AT THE HEART OF IT ALL is the latest paperback collection of ZERO, collecting issued 6–10 in one volume and continues the story of Edward Zero, who now stands at a crossroad in his story.

Unlike the single issues the publication design of volume 2 continues the trade dress established on volume 1, building a consistent collection look, which contrasts with the design fluidity of the single issues. You’ll notice where the volume 1 cover was torn to shreds, volume 2 suffers from a bad signal.

Inside you’ll discover the same things as before: new chapter page designs, and a gallery section with all the design you perhaps had missed before.

You can find ZERO Vol. 2: AT THE HEART OF IT ALL in your local comic and book stores.No comic book store nearby (see here), or simply prefer a different option, you can buy it at Amazon (US / CA / UK). If you prefer your comics in digital format, you can get it directly at Image Comics online, or from Comixology (US / UK).

henridecorinth:

Top: The Lovers by Rene Magritte, 1928.

Bottom: Dellamorte Dellamore by Michele Soavi, 1994.

"You fellas think of comics in terms of comic books, but you’re wrong. I think you fellas should think of comics in terms of drugs, in terms of war, in terms of journalism, in terms of selling, in terms of business. And if you have a viewpoint on drugs, or if you have a viewpoint on war, or if you have a viewpoint on the economy, I think you can tell it more effectively in comics than you can in words. I think nobody is doing it. Comics is journalism."

— Jack Kirby

What does it feel like to be you? Yeah. It feels good to be you, doesn’t it? It feels good, because there’s one thing that you are — you’re the only one that’s you, right?. So you’re the only one that’s you, and we get confused sometimes — or I do, I think everyone does — you try to compete. You think, Dammit, someone else is trying to be me. Someone else is trying to be me. But I don’t have to armor myself against those people; I don’t have to armor myself against that idea if I can really just relax and feel content in this way and this regard.

If I can just feel, just think now: How much do you weigh? This is a thing I like to do with myself when I get lost and I get feeling funny. How much do you weigh? Think about how much each person here weighs and try to feel that weight in your seat right now, in your bottom right now. Parts in your feet and parts in your bum. Just try to feel your own weight, in your own seat, in your own feet. Okay? So if you can feel that weight in your body, if you can come back into the most personal identification, a very personal identification, which is: I am. This is me now. Here I am, right now. This is me now. Then you don’t feel like you have to leave, and be over there, or look over there. You don’t feel like you have to rush off and be somewhere. There’s just a wonderful sense of well-being that begins to circulate up and down, from your top to your bottom. Up and down from your top to your spine. And you feel something that makes you almost want to smile, that makes you want to feel good, that makes you want to feel like you could embrace yourself.

So what’s it like to be me? You can ask yourself, What’s it like to be me? You know, the only way we’ll ever know what it’s like to be you is if you work your best at being you as often as you can, and keep reminding yourself: That’s where home is.

adult-mag:

Ed vander Elsken, “Marseille, France,” 1975.

adult-mag:

Ed vander Elsken, “Marseille, France,” 1975.

20aliens:

New York City 1989

20aliens:

New York City 1989

fifidunks:


Obsession was lust. Youth. The unattainable. Kate Moss’ elastic skin against cracked stone. Classical bodies cut off mid-limb at the ad page’s edge (Vogue’s Venus di Milos). Also, all the big Os: orgasms, orgies, and oculi; eyes, eye-round breasts, and, in turn, Bruce Weber and Mario Sorrenti’s lenses. The fragrance’s serif label was often paired with the fine subtext “for men.” On the television spots, a woman’s voice whispered, “Between love and madness lies obsession.” The smell was “sensual, woody.” The bottle—a redacted teardrop or short pool. Where there was water, this scent was always shallow. Shallow like a lake from which Kate’s face surfaced, or a Roman bath from which Gemma Ward’s sweet teen bottom buoyed. 

And on and more…

fifidunks:

Obsession was lust. Youth. The unattainable. Kate Moss’ elastic skin against cracked stone. Classical bodies cut off mid-limb at the ad page’s edge (Vogue’s Venus di Milos). Also, all the big Os: orgasms, orgies, and oculi; eyes, eye-round breasts, and, in turn, Bruce Weber and Mario Sorrenti’s lenses. The fragrance’s serif label was often paired with the fine subtext “for men.” On the television spots, a woman’s voice whispered, “Between love and madness lies obsession.” The smell was “sensual, woody.” The bottle—a redacted teardrop or short pool. Where there was water, this scent was always shallow. Shallow like a lake from which Kate’s face surfaced, or a Roman bath from which Gemma Ward’s sweet teen bottom buoyed. 

And on and more…

aleskot:

ZERO Vol. 2: At the Heart of It All comes out this Wednesday. For those of you who don’t know, Zero is a comics series/series of graphic novels I co-create with a whole lot of amazing artists, a rather ideal colorist, a rather ideal designer and a rather ideal letterer. The basic premise is "What would happen if James Bond existed?" and then it gets rather dark and complex. 

In advance of the second collection dropping in two days, we decided to share what we do for free, and therefore we present chapter nine.
Chapter nine is, as all other chapters so far, self-contained and simultaneously an important part of the larger whole. It’s set in 1993 Bosnia. It is, at least to me, the saddest issue of them all, and there’s a rather haunted quality to it. 
You can get it via:
The Image Comics Website
Comixology
iTunes
Google Play
Dropbox
And that’s it, I believe. The release is limited — you can only download it for a few days and then the links go dead or revert to pay-to-play. 
If you don’t have Zero vol. 1 and want to get it, there’s a multitude of options, including your local comic book store, bookstores (such as the tremendous McNally-Jackson bookstore in Soho, NY), Amazon, Comixology, iTunes, the Image Comics website and (probably) more. 
Welcome to Zero.

aleskot:

ZERO Vol. 2: At the Heart of It All comes out this Wednesday. For those of you who don’t know, Zero is a comics series/series of graphic novels I co-create with a whole lot of amazing artists, a rather ideal colorist, a rather ideal designer and a rather ideal letterer. The basic premise is "What would happen if James Bond existed?" and then it gets rather dark and complex. 

In advance of the second collection dropping in two days, we decided to share what we do for free, and therefore we present chapter nine.

Chapter nine is, as all other chapters so far, self-contained and simultaneously an important part of the larger whole. It’s set in 1993 Bosnia. It is, at least to me, the saddest issue of them all, and there’s a rather haunted quality to it. 

You can get it via:

The Image Comics Website

Comixology

iTunes

Google Play

Dropbox

And that’s it, I believe. The release is limited — you can only download it for a few days and then the links go dead or revert to pay-to-play. 

If you don’t have Zero vol. 1 and want to get it, there’s a multitude of options, including your local comic book store, bookstores (such as the tremendous McNally-Jackson bookstore in Soho, NY), Amazon, Comixology, iTunes, the Image Comics website and (probably) more. 

Welcome to Zero.